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Arrested after the 78-day armed standoff during the 1990 Oka crisis, Kahentiiosta, a young Kahnawake Mohawk woman proud of her centuries-old heritage, is detained four days longer than the other women. Her crime? The prosecutor representing the Quebec government will not accept her aboriginal name. From the perspective of Kahentiiosta, we witness the arrest and detention of those who withdrew to the Treatment Centre after the Canadian Army advanced, and we learn why Kahentiiosta was prepared to die to protect the land and trees sacred to the Mohawk people of Kanehsatake.

Director: Alanis Obomsawin
Producer: Alanis Obomsawin
Writing: Alanis Obomsawin
Photography: Jean-Claude Labrecque
Photography: André-Luc Dupont
Photography: Susan Trow
Photography: Roger Rochat
Photography: Zoe Dirse
Photography: Sylvain Julienne
Photography: Alanis Obomsawin
Photography: Raymond Dumas
Photography: Pierre Landry
Photography: Jacques Avoine
Photography: Lynda Pelley
Sound: Raymond Marcoux
Sound: Ismaël Cordeiro
Sound: Hans Oomes
Sound: Alanis Obomsawin
Editing: Ruby-Marie Dennis
Sound: Don Ayer
Sound: Jean-Pierre Joutel
Music: Claude Vendette
Music: Francis Grandmont

My Name Is Kahentiiosta

1995, Obomsawin, Alanis

49 min 10 s

 

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