View all FilmsView all Films

On a rigorous and passionate quest, Huron-Wendat director René Siouï Labelle retraces the path of his ancestors and surveys their territories, recording images of stunning beauty. He unveils a historical journey known to very few as he reflects upon the identity of the Wendat nation. In the 1600s, when the Wendat met Europeans, they were a prosperous society. They had been living on the shores of the Saint Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes for centuries. Tragically, the arrival of foreigners created massive upheavals that led to the disintegration of the great Wendat Confederation. A spiritual energy emanates from the men and women we encounter in this film, most of them from Wendake, 8 km north-west of Stadacona, which Chief Donnacona described to Jacques Cartier as the great village, or "Kanata." In French with English subtitles.

Director: René Sioui Labelle
Producer: Jacques Ménard
Producer: Jacques Vallée
Sound: Diane Carrière
Sound: Marie-France Delagrave
Voice and Narration: Michel Bonneau
Voice and Narration: Brigitte-Anne Pelletier
Music: Daniel Bouliane
Music: André Mongeon
Sound: Shelley Craig
Sound: Geoffrey Mitchell

Kanata: Legacy of the Children of Aataentsic

1999, Sioui Labelle, René

86 min 44 s

 

Help

 

Internet connection

Each film on this site is available for viewing at low speed or high speed.

  • Low speed: recommended if your Internet connection uses a dial-up modem (56 kbps or slower). Low-speed viewing results in lower quality image and sound.
  • High speed: recommended if you have high-speed Internet (DSL, cable modem) or are connected to an institutional network. Viewing in high-speed mode may cause occasional jerky images and sound interruptions if the speed of your connection is not fast enough.

If you're not sure which speed to use for viewing the films, try high speed first. If the results are not satisfactory, switch to low speed.

 

Format

Films can be available for viewing in either Macromedia Flash or QuickTime. Image and sound quality are similar for all these formats.

  • Flash: lets you view the film directly in the Web page without launching an external application. Requires the Flash plug-in (download for free at Macromedia Flash Player).
  • QuickTime (alternative format): requires QuickTime, version 7 or more recent (download for free at QuickTime).
 

Closed captions (CC)

Translation of the audio portion of a film into subtitles, for example, dialogue, narration, sound effects, etc. These captions let hearing-impaired viewers read what they cannot hear. Closed captions are available for a few films. To access them, you must select QuickTime (under Format) and With closed captions (under Accessibility).

 

Described video (DV)

A narrated description of a film's key visual elements to enable the vision-impaired to form a mental picture of what is happening on screen. Described video is available for a few films. To access them, you must select QuickTime (under Format) and With described video (under Accessibility).


© National Film Board of Canada | Copyright | Accessibility | Credits
This web site is partly funded by Canadian Culture Online