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It was the summer of 2000 and the country watched with disbelief as federal fishery officers appeared to wage war on the Mi'gmaq fishermen of Esgenoopetitj, or Burnt Church, New Brunswick. Why would officials of the Canadian government attack citizens for exercising rights that had been affirmed by the highest court in the land? What happened at Burnt Church?

Alanis Obomsawin casts her cinematic and intellectual nets into history to provide a context for the events on Miramichi Bay. Delineating the complex roots of the conflict with passion and clarity, she builds a persuasive defence of the Mi'gmaq position.

Obomsawin's numerous credits include Incident at Restigouche (1984) and Kanehsatake 270 Years of Resistance (1993). With Is the Crown at war with us?, she once again offers compelling insight into the complex relationship between Canada and its First Nations.



Music: Francis Grandmont
Writing: Alanis Obomsawin
Director: Alanis Obomsawin
Editing: Alison Burns
Photography: Philippe Amiguet
Photography: Yoan Cart
Photography: Michel La Veaux
Sound: Raymond Marcoux
Sound: Ismaël Cordeiro
Sound: André Chaput
Sound: Patrick Knup
Voice and Narration: Arthur Holden
Voice and Narration: Tony Robinow
Voice and Narration: Alanis Obomsawin
Art and Design: Sgoagani
Consultant: Alanis Obomsawin
Photography: Pierre Landry
Sound: Serge Boivin
Sound: Jean Paul Vialard
Producer: Alanis Obomsawin

Is the Crown at war with us?

2002, Obomsawin, Alanis

160 min 31 s

 

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