Sovereignty and Resistance

This theme offers film excerpts on land claims, management of natural resources, ancestral rights and recovery of Aboriginal cultural artefacts. It also presents images showing the resistance of Aboriginal peoples to repression by non-Aboriginal culture.

Excerpts


Dancing Around the Table, Part One

Dancing Around the Table, Part One 2


Our Nationhood

Our Nationhood 3

Our Nationhood 5


Riel Country

Riel Country 3

Riel Country 4


Totem: The Return of the G'psgolox Pole

Totem: The Return of the G'psgolox Pole 2

Dancing Around the Table, Part One

1987, Director: Bulbulian, Maurice

excerpt 2      5 min 29 s


 


Description A discussion transpires between Prime Minister Trudeau and James Gosnell, chief of the Nisga’a Tribal Council, concerning Aboriginal territorial rights. British Columbian Aboriginal leader Bill Wilson states that in order to understand what Aboriginals want, it is necessary to stop interpreting their demands from the perspective of claims made by the dominant society.
Questions 1. At the constitutional talks of 1983 what does chairman and Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau state is the Canadian government’s position with regards to the Aboriginal Peoples assertion of their sovereignty within Canada?

2. What position on sovereignty does Bill Wilson articulate on behalf of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis people? How is it different from the government’s position?

About This Film

Synopsis

A film about the three Conferences on the Constitutional Rights of the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada (1983-84-85), focussing on the concept of self-government.

Director: Maurice Bulbulian
Editing: Maurice Bulbulian
Photography: Serge Giguère
Photography: Roger Rochat
Photography: Jean-Pierre Lachapelle
Photography: Charles Lavack
Sound: Yvon Benoît
Sound: Jean-Guy Normandin
Sound: Yves Gendron
Sound: Esther Auger
Sound: Andrew Koster
Sound: Marc Hébert
Sound: Michelle Guérin
Sound: Roger Lamoureux


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