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Individuals as Citizens and Consumers
This sub-section examines the damage caused by over-consumption, looks at citizens' responsibility and suggests some ways of protecting the environment.
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Excerpt (1:11)
An Ecology of Hope
2001, production : Fernand Dansereau
Environmental action can take many forms - public and...
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Excerpt (2:06)
Le Mont Rigaud : une colline chez les hommes
2000, production : André Desrochers
Hunters often share conservation ethics with...
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Excerpt (2:19)
Journey of the Blob/Voyage sans fin
1989, production : Bill Maylone
Waste disposal is brought into question when a boy creates a...
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Excerpt (1:40)
Class Project: The Garbage Movie
1980, production : Martin Defalco
Students attending high school in 1980 learn about...
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An Ecology of Hope
Excerpt  (1:11) 2001, production : Fernand Dansereau
Description
Environmental action can take many forms - public and political, as well as private and personal. Brazilian architect/ecologist Mauricio Andres Ribeiro suggests adopting the Buddhist idea of non-harm. Just as we should behave in ways that avoid causing harm to others, we should try to live in a manner that avoids harming the environment.

More info on this film in NFB catalogue »»


While the environment may be threatened by man, it will also be saved by man. So believes Pierre Dansereau, ecologist, visionary and inveterate optimist. Brimming with an amazing vitality at age 90, the internationally renowned scientist has a wide-ranging knowledge and a passionate commitment to humanity. In retracing the highlights of his long and fruitful life, the film takes us from Baffin Island to New York City, from the Gaspé Peninsula to Brazil. At each stop on this mini world tour, we witness landscapes of breathtaking beauty. All things are interrelated and the harmony of the whole is essential to our very survival.
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